Profiling Which Ontario Workers have Access to Health Benefits

Submitted by Natasha Pei on February 17, 2015 - 10:00am

Medicare in Canada is universal, but there are gaps in the services provided and people who have access to public services.  For example, prescription drugs, vision care and dental care are all extra burdens shouldered by individuals, and the cost becomes a barrier to positive health outcomes.  
Wellesely Institute has examined data from Statistics Canada's Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics to determine who is more likely to have employer-provided health benefits, and who is left in the cold.

Their findings include:

• One-third of paid employees in Ontario do not have employer-provided medical or dental benefits.
• People with low earnings have lower levels of employer-provided health benefit coverage than thosewith higher earnings, with fewer than one in five people earning less than $10,000 receiving benefits through their employer compared with more than 90 percent of people earning over $100,000.
• Men have are more likely to have employer-provided benefits than women. 

They conclude that better public access to health services would reduce the health inequality gap for Ontarians.

Download the full report, 'Low Wages, No Benefits' by Steve Barnes, Vanessa Abban, and Alexandra Weiss below. 

This is very good article and

This is very good article and very informative. I should try to remember those information's. I really enjoyed with this article. My pleasure to being here on your blog..I wanna come back here for new post from your site. I am thoroughly impressed by the way you present your article, information and the ability to give unknown facts is the most surprising factor of all. This article looks very good.


Tadalafil Online