Recent Publications

Poverty Costs Saskatchewan

A new approach to prosperity for all
Poverty Costs Saskatchewan: A new approach to prosperity for all was produced as part of the Poverty Costs campaign, an initiative involving several community-based organizations including representatives from the Saskatoon Food Bank & Learning Centre, the Saskatoon Anti-Poverty Coalition, Upstream, and Unite Digital Marketing Co-op, as well as representatives from the Saskatoon Health Region, and the Saskatoon Poverty Reduction Partnership. Poverty Costs is a campaign to raise awareness about the economic cost of Poverty in Saskatchewan, recently calculated to be $3.8 billion each year in heightened service use and missed economic opportunities, and to mobilize the Saskatchewan community to call for a comprehensive poverty reduction plan. The campaign was developed as an initiative of a working group of the Saskatoon Poverty Reduction Partnership.

Victoria Foundation releases Vital Signs report

Victoria Foundation released its 2014 Victoria's Vital Signs® report, their ninth annual check-up of the Greater Victoria region as a place to live, work, play and grow.

Community Foundation launches Vital Signs 2014

Report on quality of life in Southern Alberta
The Community Foundation of Southeastern Alberta (CFSEA) released the eighth annual 2014 Vital Signs® report, giving Medicine Hatters and for the first time Bow Island residents, more insight into their community. This annual check-up provides an indication of the quality of life, highlighting 11 issue areas, such as Youth, Living Standards, Belonging & Engagement and Environment – virtually transforming local facts and figures into ready-made stories.

Poverty Indicators in Waterloo

Status Report 2014
Waterloo Region released Poverty Indicators in Waterloo Region: Status Report 2014, An Initiative of the Region’s Comprehensive Approach to Poverty Reduction.

September 2014 Federal Policy Monitor

Caledon Institute social policy roundup
September's announcements include changes to Employment Insurance rules, increases in Old Age Security benefits and several governance-related items (of particular note: a pension plan sustainability assessment by the Parliamentary Budget Officer).

September 2014 Provincial/Territorial Policy Monitor

Caledon Institute social policy roundup
September announcements include Nova Scotia's Throne Speech and Ontario renewed poverty reduction strategy.  Search previous issues by jurisdiction and subject area on the Caledon website.

Fostering health through healing in Nunavut

Engaging the community to create a poverty reduction strategy
This case study looks at Nunavut’s shared leadership approach to developing a poverty reduction strategy. It discusses why healing from the wounds inflicted by colonialism is an integral part of The Makimaniq Plan: A Shared Approach to Poverty Reduction. In Inuktitut, Makimaniq means “empowerment” or “standing up for yourself.” The strategy grew out of intense collaboration between government and Inuit organizations, and public and non-governmental organizations, and resulted in the Collaboration for Poverty Reduction Act, in 2013. - See more at: http://nccdh.ca/resources/entry/fostering-health#sthash.D74hF5u8.dpuf

August 2014 Municipal Policy Monitor

Caledon Institute, Vibrant Canada and Collaborators
This edition of the Municipal Policy Monitor features details of the work to develop a poverty reduction strategy for Edmonton.  Search this and previous editions of the Monitor at the Caledon website.

Poverty Reduction Initiative 2014 Report

Plans for Action as a Community
Eliminating poverty remains one of the most potent and persistent challenges we face in our community. The statistics are daunting, and the real impact on human lives – people who are our neighbours, friends and family – can make your heart wince. So many of our children, families and neighbours are vulnerable to desperate circumstances, which can be caused in an instant by an unexpected layoff or a family breakup, an accident or sudden illness – or by ongoing cycles that span generations. Living in poverty means there is not enough money for the basics of a healthy life. Poverty imposes hard economic choices — between shelter and medicine, food and transportation, childcare and employment
opportunities, moving towards a self-sufficient future versus just getting through today. Collectively, we need to change these circumstances. When poverty is everybody’s business, we make real progress. With this report, we are pleased to highlight some of the meaningful progress that has been made over the past year, thanks to those who are part of this great effort — agencies who work with clients in poverty, policy makers who shape the environment that reduces or sustains poverty, individuals and families who live the experience every day, and all of us who must collectively understand this complex issue and stand together to one day eradicate the stress, suffering and hopelessness that walk hand
in hand with poverty. Access the full report: 2014 Report - Plans for Action as a Community